05-07-1979 McGonagles, Dublin
Attendance, unknown
Support, unknown
Admission, unknown

Set; unknown

Advert from Hot Press

 

U2 continue their Thursday night residency at McGonagle's after the 4 weeks of "Jingle Balls" concerts.


11-07-1979 Community Centre, Howth, Dublin
Attendance, unknown
Support, unknown
Admission, unknown

Set; unknown

12-07-1979 McGonagles, Dublin

Attendance, unknown
Support, unknown
Admission, unknown

Set; unknown

Advert from the Dublin Evening Press

18-07-1979 Meeting Place, Dublin

Dorset Street, Dublin
Anti Nuclear Benefit Concert
Attendance, unknown
Support Rocky DeValera & The Gravedigers, Scuillion
Admission, between £0.70p & £1.00

Set; unknown

Capacity at the Meeting Place is only 130, ticket prices range from £0.70p to £1.00. This is the one and only time U2 are known to have played this venue. This could have been the start of U2's support for the anti nuclear movement, many years later they would play a show in Manchester protesting against the Sellafield plant in the north west of England.

Rocky DeValera & The Gravediggers are; Rocky Ferdia MacAnna (vocals), Pierre Parnell Nicky Barrett (guitar), Jack Dublin Paul Brown (bass).

At this time I have no information on Scuillion


19-07-1979 McGonagles, Dublin

Attendance, unknown
Support Casanova OK
Admission, unknown

Set; unknown

Advert from Hot Press

 

Casanova OK are; Sammy Nevin Lead Guitar, Tony Coughlan Rhythm Guitar & Vocals, Frank Daly Bass, Derek Faye Drums


26-07-1979 McGonagles, Dublin

Attendance, unknown
Support, unknown
Admission, unknown

Set; unknown

Advert from Hot Press

27-07-1979 Howth Community Centre, Dublin
Attendance, unknown
Support, unknown
Admission, unknown

Set; unknown

Taken from the Hot Press gig guide

28-07-1979 Dandelion Market, Dublin

Attendance approx 200
Support The Strougers
Admission, £0.50p

Set; includes Pretty Vacant

Photo supplied by Pete McClusky, Pete on stage

This is the only known concert U2 play without The Edge on guitar. Joe Savino (from the Brown Thomas Band) & Denis Rusk of the (Strougers) join U2 on stage, included in the set is a cover version of the "Pistols" "Pretty vacant".
Bono would work the door at these gigs, taking the 50p entrance fee off the punters before going on stage.

Emmett O'Reilly  Well, there was the fairly-well documented incident where Denis's foot went through a hole in the patched-up stage, right up to his thigh and he just kept playing. Sound was pretty good, the band were getting very solid, as I recall. U2's set at the time was well-paced, power-pop with a touch of a more expansive style developing. Edge was beginning to sound like a serious, serious talent & I often spent entire gigs mostly listening to his playing.
Denis Rusk the stage was scaffolding poles with lino to stand on. Very rock and roll. 

Pete McCluskey "the edge was taken ill with suspect meningitis and bono played and sang for the first couple of numbers. he soon found the guitar a bit restricting and asked was there anyone in the audience who could play guitar. without hesitation, joe savino put his hand up and called to bono. he made his way to the stage and strapped on the guitar and played a few n umbers with the rest of u2 – i’m nearly sure i remember one song was a rolling stones song… i remember he was wearing a black overcoat at the time and he looked like one of echo and the bunnymen aginst the u2 lads in their t-shirts."

This is the first of two gigs U2 play today the second being at the Downtown Kampus in Cork. It is not known whether the Edge or Bono played guitar at the Cork concert.
The Strougers are; Bitzy AKA Gerard Fitzgerald (vocal), Peter McCluskey (Vocals & Guitar), Denis Rush (lead guitar), Noel Kellegher (guitar), Shay Hiney (bass), Brendan Byrne (drums). Peter is pictured below.
Peter McCluskey “THE ONE WITH PETE AT THE DANDELION WHERE HIS GLASSES FELL OFF.....1979 was sure a craaaazy year. note the jumper i'm wearing...an old girlfriend gave it to me and i had to keep wearing it and wearing it and wearing it in case she'd turn up to see was i wearing it and if i wasn't i just KNEW there'd be trouble.......”
for those of you who remember the dandelion gigs on a saturday and sunday afternoons...the strougers ( a band i was in ) played there a number of times - 2/3 times supporting an up-and-coming U2 ...came across this old newspaper ad...
Peter McCluskey i remember you falling off stage, i remember playing support to u2, i remember jumping off stage after our set and then standing with a tape recorder recording the u2 gig - still have it on tape. i remember playing with another band of mine called DRIVER, whatshisname o'rourke on bass, bill graham was there and reviewed us in hotpress the next week. i remember playing with u2 and the edge couldn't make it cos he had suspected meningitis and bono had to play guitar. he got fed up, asked if anyone could play guitar and joe savino jumped on stage and played. i remember trying to hold my balance on the shifting planks of the stage. i remember the music, the fun, the thrill of it all........
Colm O'Kelly I remember that dando gig(when the edge got sick)Paul came running out into the courtyard in a total panic running around like a looney and spotting band members (me included) I`m sorry to say that I didn't help him but enjoyed seeing him sweat a bit, guess I was jealous of them.


28-07-1979 Downtown Kampus, Cork

Attendance, unknown
Support, Bootlace
Admission, unknown

Set; unknown
Advert from Cork Evening Echo

This is U2's second gig of the day, the first was an afternoon gig at the Dandelion Market in Dublin. The Edge did not play the afternoon gig as he was ill, Bono, Denis Rusk (The Strougers) & Joe Savino of the Brown Thomas Band played guitar instead. It is not know if the Edge or U2 played this gig. This could be U2's first headline appearance at the Arcadia Ballroom.

Bootlace are; John Spillane Guitar, Dave Murphy, Tom Buckley, Niall Marron Drums

Concerts at the Downtown Kampus are put on by the student union at University College Cork. The original couple of gigs at the Kampus were held in the college canteen, but this venue proved to be too small, so it was moved to the Arcadia Ballroom. The ballroom was a well known showband venue for many years. These concerts were organised by Elvera Butler, founder of Reekus Records in Ireland. 


04-08-1979 McGonagles, Dublin

Attendance, unknown
Support for Zebra
Admission, unknown

Set; unknown

 

Advert from "In Dublin"

Zebra are; Pete Deane (vocal & guitar), Steven Rekab (vocal & guitar), Bernard Rangel (Percussion & vocal), Norman Morrow (Keyboards), Brian Narty (Bass), Mark Thyme (Drums). 

Back in 1979 Zebra were Ireland's only reggae band. Like U2 they played at the Dandelion Market & can also be found on the "Just Kicks" LP.

10-08-1979 Community Centre, Howth, Dublin

Attendance, unknown
Support The Modulators, The Strougers
Admission, unknown

Set; includes Cartoon World, Life on A Distant Planet, Stories For Boys, Silver Lining.

Advert from Hot Press

Review by Neil McCormick We supported the again at Howth Community Centre in August. This was our territory, the hall was crammed & the Modulators played a blinder. Then U2 came on & ripped the roof of the place. They played a furious new wave rocker called "Cartoon World" (written, so I gathered, by the Edge, which might account for why it had finished lyrics rather than relying on lots of "oo-ee-oo's). Against a chunky, stop start guitar, Bono delivered droll depictions of ordinary lives where the characters seem to be increasingly dysfunctional, climaxing with the memorable couplet; "Jack & Jill go up the hill/ they pick some flowers & pop some pills!" With Bono roaring the punchline with maximum showmanship, hands aloft as the Edge's guitar kicked in the chorus, the crowd went absolutely wild. These were Beatles in the Carvern experiences for me. I was getting used to seeing all the big names who came to Ireland, but U2's gigs were always the most special.

Peter McCluskey (The Strougers) "We managed to blag a couple of gigs supporting U2. We had been to see a U2 concert at McGonagle's. After the show our bass player Shay Hiney, talked me into going upstairs to the dressing room to try and blag a gig supporting U2. Shay was the type of guy that could talk his way into anywhere for free. We went upstairs and burst into the dressing room, Paul McGuinness was sat in the corner dressed in a suit and smoking a big cigar. Shay informed the stunned Paul that we had just cut a demo & would like a slot supporting U2. Paul must of been impressed because we got our gig, we were to support U2 at Howth. It only dawned on us later, how do we get our equipment to Howth, we lived the other side of Dublin.
On the day we had to take our guitars and and drums on the bus to Dublin centre and then change busses to get out to Howth. When we arrived in Howth we had to carry our equipment up the hill to the Community Centre.
When we arrived at the Centre U2 seemed very nervous, they did a long sound check, with Bono standing on the dance floor listening to the other to make sure the sound was just right, Bono was wearing his black and white check trousers. The rumour was that an A&R man from CBS would be at the show, this could explain why Bono appeared to be nervous."

Shay Hiney You were there all right! Remember the U2 gig in Howth CC when we were supporting them... The night the A & R gang were out .. And you copped Adam's bass was out of tune.... I told him, he got it in tune.. And the rest is history! So, you are part of the story Denis ! Funny, Just remembered that now...

Hot Press
So the Strougers play undistinguished music in a distinguished way. One's perspective depends on the group's own perspective. In a world of Talking Heads and Teardrop Explodes what's the point? But in a world of gigs in Howth, supporting U2 at short notice, with 30 people coming from Navan Road to see you and the same 30 helping to carry your gear on the bus both to and fro, is not to be dismissed.


11-08-1979 Dandelion Market, Dublin

Attendance, approx 200
Support The Strougers
Admission, £0.50p

Set; Out Of Control, Speed Of Life, In Your Hands, The Fool, Concentration Cramp, Another Time, Another Place, Stories For Boys, Shadows And Tall Trees, Cartoon World, Alone In The Light, Street Missions, Life On A Distant Planet, Boy Girl, encore Out Of Control, Glad To See You Go.

The gates leading into the Dandelion Market

Set; Out Of Control, Speed Of Life, In Your Hands, The Fool, Concentration Cramp, Another Time, Another Place, Stories For Boys, Shadows And Tall Trees, Cartoon World, Alone In The Light, Street Missions, Life On A Distant Planet, Boy Girl, encore Out Of Control, Glad To See You Go.

Many thanks to Pete McCluskey for the full set list, Peter recorded this concert on his tape deck.

This was the third of the now legendary Market gigs. U2 would play this venue 8 times in 1979.

The Strougers are; Bitzy AKA Gerard Fitzgerald (vocal), Peter McCluskey (Vocals & Guitar), Denis Rush (lead guitar), Noel Kellegher (guitar), Shay Hiney (bass), Brendan Byrne (drums). Peter is pictured below.
Peter McCluskey

Pete McCluskey  “We got back late after the Howth gig and as we were not due at the market till after midday on Saturday, I decided to have a lay in on the Saturday morning. I got up late Saturday morning, did all the normal things breakfast wash etc, and then went to get my guitar from my parents room which is were I kept it. The door to my parents room was locked, I called my dad to ask him were the key was. He told me my mum had it & she was in Dublin shopping. My heart sank, how could I do the U2 gig with no guitar. My dad said he would go in to Dublin & find my mum & get the key (don’t forget this is way before we all had mobile phones). Off he went to Dublin on his bike, somehow he found her & returned with the key. At last I could get my guitar, but it was now too late for me to make the gig. So my dad paid for a taxi to take me to the market (this was the first time I had ever been in a taxi). I arrived just in time to get on stage and start playing”.
“After we finished our set & were getting our gear off the stage, the Edge gave me his Gibson Explorer guitar & asked if I would put it on the stage for him. I could not believe how heavy it was, we were used to cheap copies not the real thing”!

Peter McCluskey i remember you falling off stage, i remember playing support to u2, i remember jumping off stage after our set and then standing with a taperecorder recording the u2 gig - still have it on tape. i remember playing with another band of mine called DRIVER, whatshisname o'rourke on bass, bill graham was there and reviewed us in hotpress the next week. i remember playing with u2 and the edge couldn't make it cos he had suspected meningitis and bono had to play guitar. he got fed up, asked if anyone could play guitar and joe savino jumped on stage and played. i remember trying to hold my balance on the shifting planks of the stage. i remember the music, the fun, the thrill of it all........


16-08-1979 El Ruedo, Carlow
Attendance, unknown
Support, unknown
Admission, unknown

Set; unknown

To date this is the only time U2 are known to have played Carlow.

Many of Ireland's top bands of the time played this venue including The Radiators From Space, The Vipers, Fit Kilkenny & the Remoulds, Sacre Bleu, The Sinners, Fabulous Fabrics, BT's.


21-08-1979 Baggot Inn, Dublin

Attendance, unknown
Support, Dj Dave Fanning, The Blades
Admission, unknown

Set; includes Concentration Cramp, In Your Hand, Stories For Boys, Shadows & Tall Trees, Out Of Control.

Advert from Dublin Evening Press

The Blades are; 
Paul Cleary (vocal & bass), Lawrence Cleary (guitar), Pat Larkin (drums).

Capacity is 400, normal ticket prices range from £0.80p to £1.00


Paul Slattery "Sounds" Showtime! The Blades came on and played a damn fine set. U2, I thought, would have to be a decent band to follow them and we were not disappointed. U2 came on stage and gave a really inspired performance to the 100 or so people packed into the bar. They could really play and Bono's theatrical performance saw him running around the stage and jumping on various chairs. Everyone in the room went crazy and I thought; they're a hell of a good live band . Naturally the steady flow of Guinness had helped, but I'd actually taken two rolls of film of them on stage, which was a lot for me.


Sounds review Dave McCullough Later that night we arrived and I finally had the pleasure of catching the fabled U2 live. The venue was the Baggot Inn which lives up to it's sleazy name with a vengeance. "Tonight's something of a test night", Bono explained. "This is the first New Wave type gig this place has put on and if it's a success then bands might be able to use it regularly". 

Gigs are a scarce commodity in Dublin. In fact, there are none, save the odd fortunate one nighter at one of the many "straighter" rock venues (ancient Skid Row and Horslips guitarists rool OK, y'understand) or the odd support slot at one of the city's two or three bigger, ballroom type venues (a band called D.C. Nien tonight having the unenviable task of warming up an AC/DC audience).
Bands, therefore, are hungry and they must search for gigs, as U2 have done. Their labour is not in vain, either, as the gig this night proves. The band give evidence to their burgeoning popularity in the city by cramming as many bodies into a scantily publicised Hope & Anchor type gig as is physically (as opposed to legally) possible.
Their set is quite brilliant. It's an often disarming experience travelling out of London and seeing relatively unknown bands capable of taking on the prima donnas of the Hammersmith Odeon, Marquee and Nashville and wiping the proverbial floor with them (re Tours and Undertones in the past) and this was yet another such occasion. U2 are total, solid music, naturally intended for the head and for the feet, inculcating meaning innovation, expressing enough power in communication to knock the unsuspecting listener on his back.
Guitarist David Edge is the most flamboyant player I've seen since Stuart Adamson of The Skids (a major influence, as they say) creating a sizeable, unique niche of sound that spreads across U2's music with scintillating effect, joining together with Larry Mullin's bass and Adam Clayton's drums to form what the band constantly seek, namely a wide sound and a big impression.
Front man Bono is a new r'n'r performer. He takes the genre's tricks of the trade and tries them out on his audience, shifting their opinions and attitudes. In this sense U2 are unashamedly didactic; they attack their their audience and hope maybe to leave them at the end of the night feeling shifted or moved in their attitudes.
Bono, like the rest of U2 and The Virgin Prunes, study mine in order "to use up every little ounce of space on stage". The effect is totally absorbing. You follow Bono with your eyes as he counts on his fingers or runs across stage or spontaneously mines something that is impenetrable but apposite to the moody, fat rolling sound. At the Baggot the mike broke in front of him. Instead of panicking he used the fluke, calling a kid from the audience down front, thrusting the mike into his upheld right hand and using his right arm, as it were, as a mike stand throughout the song.
And the songs are splendid, inspired impressions of that big sound the band seek, from the Skidsian raunch of "Out Of Control", the analytical power of "Twilight" and "Stories For Boys" or the speedy pop of "Boy Girl", revealing an already established, remarkable songwriting force.
Like The Fall or the Zoo bands or Swell Maps, U2 have thrown the New Wave over their collective shoulders and are now stepping out in the direction of more vital contemporary expression while instinctively still retaining the clipped muscularity of the '76 revolution.
In this small space I can but present you with a whisper of the U2 vibe. Suffice to say that a single should be available soon in Ireland on CBS with an album to follow (tentatively titled "Boy") and all hell will break loose over the coming months about this marvellous, mystical band. It's just a thought, but somebody suggested that if the Boomtown Rats were the John the Baptists of Irish r'n'r, then U2 must be......

Taken from an interview in Hot Press with Paul Cleary of The Blades "With the original line-up we were fairly ragged to begin with, which is only natural as it was 1977 and making a bit of a racket was all-important. We definitely improved immensely because we always believed that songs were the key to everything and we worked really hard on those. As you know yourself there was an awful lot of shape-throwing going on in Dublin back then and very few songs knocking around. U2 were more into an overall sound than anything else, The Virgin Prunes I didn't even reckon were a band at all, more like some weird art project, DC Nien The Atrix .
"I'd always been a big fan of The Beatles and Motown, so when we started writing songs I was looking to people like Lennon & McCartney and Smokey Robinson and trying to see how they structured their stuff. And let's face it, if you're going to pinch ideas then they're the boys to hit!"
“Via a residency in Pearse Street's The Magnet ("Our home venue in the early years!") The Blades quickly graduated to larger city centre venues, one of their most memorable adventures being the now legendary six-week residency in The Baggot Inn with U2 in the late 70s. Much was made of the supposed rivalry between the bands but Paul insists that this was blown out of all proportion”.
"That was definitely a media thing," he states categorically. "There might have been a certain degree of animosity between our fans and their fans but that's always the way - it's like Celtic and Rangers fans battering each other while the players shake hands and have a drink after the match. We always got on reasonably well with U2. They had their thing, we had ours and the two bands sounded absolutely nothing like each other so there wasn't anything in that at all. They were about to release their debut album, we hadn't even recorded 'Hot For You', they were off to America, we hadn't even played London at that point the rivalry was hyped up, definitely."
Dave Fanning “U2 played four Tuesday nights at the Baggot Inn, supported by “The Blades”. I introduced the bands & DJ’d before & after the sets. U2 were on the up but The Blades by then had a bunch of singles behind them, all of which I still regard as classic Irish singles. Paul Cleary was a great singer & songwriter, & they had a strong working class following, but their live thrill didn’t translate to their first album. At the Baggot gigs, though, there were still people who came for the The Blades & left when U2 came on”.

28-08-1979 Magnet Bar, Dublin

Attendance, 50
Support, unknown
Admission, £1.00, £0.75p with student or dole card

Set; unknown

From the Irish Times

This is a benefit concert for the short lived "Rock against sexism" campaign. It may also be the only time U2 played the Magnet Bar.

This concert took place in 1979 not 1978, as previously thought. Joe Breen of the Irish Times advertises this concert in his column dated Monday 13th August 1979.


01-09-1979 Downtown Kampus, Cork

Attendance, 933 this figure was supplied by the promoter Elvera Butler
Support D.C. Nien, Virgin Prunes, Z
Admission, unknown

Set; unknown

Advert from Hot Press

D.C. Nien are; Damien Gunn (vocal & sax), Paul McGuinness (guitar), Brendan Gannon (keyboards), Brian Seales (bass), Ken Mahon (drums).
Virgin Prunes are: Fionan Hanvey (Gavin Friday) Vocals, Derek Rowen (Guggi) Vocals, David Watson (David Id) Vocals, Dik Evans Guitar, Trevor Rowen (Strongman) Bass, Anthony Murphy (Pod) Drums
Z are a keyboard based band lead by Steve Avrill.
Interview supplied by Elvera Butler Excerpt from recent interview with Ricky Dineen of Nun Attax/5 Go Down to the Sea. Brings back lots of memories of the Kampus gig .....'
You used to play a bit with fairly straightforward r’n’b type groups like the Bogey Boys and the Noel Redding Band. How did that work out?
This used to happen a lot at the Arc, but I think people would have turned up to the Arc if the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra and the Residents were playing. They didn’t care.
It was a social thing as much as anything else?
Yeah, we’d go in and say to hello to was playing, they’d do their set and we’d do ours. There was no big audience coming to see the Bogey Boys or whoever. Or us, for that matter, although there may have been a few for us in later years because we were local. It was a place that people went to no matter who was playing. The bigger the band, the bigger the crowd obviously, but you’d always get a thousand every Saturday.
It was a great gig for any of the bands coming from Dublin because they’d be unknown. I remember U2, DC Nein and two other Dublin bands playing there and the place was jointed. It was probably the best venue in the country at the time. You’d get paid too. Other places, it’d cost you money to play there but at the Arc you’d get £20 in your pocket at the end of the night.
There was no drink there. Everybody got pissed at the pub next door, Handlebars. The guy that owned it was one of the grumpiest men in the world but he tolerated us, he got to like us in the end. He understood that punks weren’t evil bastards that were gonna eat your babies. He was a great guy, he was a grumpy cunt but he warmed up. I remember when the Cure played, there was a running battle outside. It was on the front page of the Examiner- ‘Punks Run Riot Before Punk Concert’. It was just the guards running riot and they ran into Handlebars and started batoning everybody and fucked everybody out.
Did you headline the Arc much? Somebody told me that you could fill the Arc as the headline act.
A few times, yeah. As I said though, anybody could have played there and packed it out so I wouldn’t read too much into that. We wouldn’t have had fans, like. I do remember walking to work one morning and seeing a schoolgirl with Nun Attax written on her bag and I was chuffed (laughs) but that was the only time I saw that. That was the end of it! (laughs). 


07 & 08-09-1979 Project Arts Centre, Dublin

Attendance, unknown
Support for Patrick Fitzgerald
Admission, unknown

Set; includes Out Of Control, Boy/Girl, Stories For Boys.

Advert from Dublin Evening Press

Hot Press Review by Ross Fitzsimons Despite early problems, U2 recovered well to play a blistering set of original material. Every time I see this band they improve – their upcoming E.P. “U2-3” will be essential purchase. No less.

Bill Graham "Another Time, Another Place" The next night, a group of the "Black Catholics  appeared, drunk after a cider party. They would claim they intended no disruption but at the first hint of trouble, the reinforced Project security were in no mood to be conciliatory. They ejected the gang after a bruising tussle in the foyer with Paul McGuinness to the fore, dragging out one of the offenders by the hair. It was hardly Altamont - the Black Catholics were more mouth than muscle - but don't ever believe the young U2 were unanimously hailed in Dublin.

Bill Graham Hot Press Sham army tactics have seriously disrupted the London post – punk rock scene to no one’s good. Now it appears that the shamin fashion may be spreading to Dublin.
Two month’s ago, a Liberty Hall gig headlined by Zebra was reduced to shambles after a sector of the audience boarded the stage. Last weekend at the Project, U2, who were supporting Patrick Fitzgerald were targets of an unprovoked assault.
As our man on the move Ross Fitzsimons reports a group arrived down & began taunting the band but the verbal displeasure escalated to direct & seemingly drunken action as critics jumped on stage, threw cider about & in one instance kicked U2 bassist Adam Clayton. After two numbers, the band quit the stage & the situation became so unruly that two Gardai had to called to escort the disruptors from the premises.
That was Friday night but the following evening, the vendetta continued. One troublesome patron was speedily ejected by U2 manager Paul McGuinness but after McGuinness returned to the auditorium, a bruising skirmish ensued in the foyer & outside.
U2 have been seen in some quarters (ie by a bunch of pathetic prejudiced boors – Ed) as lacking that easily counterfeltable currency “street credibility” but in this case dislike has boiled over into unwanted exhibition of enmity.
What’s most dispiriting is that the disturbances occurred at the opening of a new sequence of weekend Project gigs, the one late night Dublin venue that doesn’t bar under 18’s & attempts a more relaxed security policy. Project’s Peter Sheridan was moved to apologizes to the Friday night audience for the interruptions but clearly the events can’t have helped the centre’s morale.
Imitating one London fashion that shouldn’t be slavishly acquired these devotees of “action – criticism” indulge other’s tolerance to endanger everyone’s entertainment, including their own. They speak of the street but they skirmish indoors. Yet another pose?
And one every anti – rock censor will gain from. Who needs that?


09-09-1979 Dandelion Market, Dublin

Attendance, 200
Support, No Support
Admission, £0.50p

Set; unknown

This was the first of 3 consecutive weekends U2 would play at the now legendary Dandelion Market, in total U2 would play 8 Market gigs in 1979.

By John Fisher The gigs in the Dandelion Market have become the source of many a tall tale, unfounded rumour & urban legend. So this is my recollection of the venue & how it came to be.
In the summer of 1976, me (John Fisher) & Eoin O'Shea went to The reading Festival & The Rolling Stones in Knebworth & saw the early days of the Punk explosion in London. We came back with or rucksacks full of badges & set up a stall in the market selling badges, T-Shirts, posters etc. Up until then, the market had been a bit of a hippy haven - full of cheesecloth shirts, incense & granddad shirts. So our stall, Sticky Fingers, was a bit out on a limb.
We decided that we needed more punks, mods & rockers coming in so we decided to use the one vacant area in the market - an enclosed dark dank shed that housed the power supply for the whole market. We cleaned it out, white washed the walls & set up a small stage, built of leftover beer crates, breeze - blocks & a few sheets of chipboard that we bought. The venue was now ready - now we needed some bands.
The Noise Boys were the first band to take to that rather shaky stage - I don't remember why exactly, maybe it was through my friendship with Tim McStay (keyboards). I do remember the next and better, Ferdia McAnna & Dave Sweeney both worked for us selling badges at the stall & had decided to set up a band, Rock DeValera & The Gravediggers. They played the next Saturday & from then on we were rocking.
That Sunday, two guys approached me & introduced themselves as Larry & Dave from a band called U2. I had herd about them & knew that they were already a real (ie. gigging) band. They wanted to see the venue & asked if they could play there. We had already booked bands for the following weekend, so I told them that they could play the week after. The legendary gigs were about to begin.
But I was also excited about the likes of Berlin, Fit Kilkenny & The Blades, all of whom I knew well. There were many memorable gigs there, for me the best of which were The Outcasts which often ended with bass player Getti leaving a pool of blood on the stage from attacking his instrument with such venom.
Over the coming weeks, the gigs went from strength to strength. We had a unique rule, we charged a flat entrance fee of 50p & the bands got all the takings, we only took a pound or two if we needed to buy new chipboard for the stage or a few light bulbs. The only other condition was that the bands who played had to come in early in order to rebuild the stage which was inevitably smashed up by the local kids during the week, when the market reverted to being a sprawling car park, & that included U2!
My other main memories of the gigs were that, especially in the winter or if the band were using more lights than usual, the main fuse would often blow. This often resulted in a complete blackout of the whole market, much to the annoyance of the other traders, especially the ones who were already angry with us for bring in a rough & rowdy bunch of punks. Another stall holder, jack The lad, was the designated electrician for the market & he would be summonsed to fix the fuse. Eventually though, to save time & hassle, he showed us how to do it & we would regularly be seen running into the corner where the fuse board was housed to do the necessary repairs.
I remember one time that U2 were playing & their lighting person hadn't turned up. The term lighting technician wasn't used the, it was only 3 spotlights on a bar on either side of the stage. I was asked to do the necessary & suddenly found myself doing the lights. I thought I was doing OK until in particular song, I turned all the lights out on one side of the stage plunging Adam into complete darkness while at the same time almost burning Edge's irises out with a full blast of light. Needless to say, I wasn't asked to do the lights on their last world tour!


15-09-1979 Dandelion Market, Dublin

Attendance, approx 200
Support The Scheme
Admission, £0.50p

Set; includes Stories For Boys, boy/Girl, Out Of Control

Photo is in reverse, as you can see by the U2 banner

The Scheme are; Ciaran Vernon Vocals, Brian Vernon Guitar & Vocals, Brian McMahon Bass & Vocals, Declan Rogers Drums.

The Scheme are a Dundalk band formed out of the ashes of NRG, they would also support the likes of The Vipers, D.C. Nien, The Blades & The Atrix.

Brian McMahon; We played 3 gigs in Dublin’s Dandelion Market in 1979, one of which had us opening for U2 on 15th September 1979. U2 were riding high, and set to release their first single, the place was packed that Saturday afternoon. The 2 things I remember most about U2 from this occasion, was

1. The record sleeve for their forthcoming single the Three Ep, was just back from the printers and delivered to them during their sound check. They were genuinely excited about this.
2. When they finished sound checking, Bono, shouted, “Scheme, your turn”. Which was a cue for us to do get up and do our check. At least he acknowledged us. And we got a sound check. More than can be said for a lot of the other groups we supported.
The gig was great. Big crowd, who were up for it. They were mad into U2, though. You could see they were going to make it.

This was the second of three concerts U2 played at the Market in September, they would play this venue 8 times in 1979.


18-09-1979 Baggot Inn, Dublin

Attendance, unknown
Support for The Lookalikes
Admission, unknown

Set; includes Out Of Control, Stories For Boys, Boy/Girl
Advert from Dublin Evening Press

The Lookalikes are; Sean O'Connor (Vocals & Guitar), Peter Keenan (Keyboards), Eamonn Doyle (Bass), Mike Mesbur (Drums).

The Lookalikes signed to the Riva record label and released 3 singles during 1980/81. They also tour the UK with Thin Lizzy in 1980 and in Europe in early 1982. Keenan, Doyle & Mesbur left the band in 1982, Sean O'Connor & The lookalikes went on to release a couple more singles.

Capacity is 400, normal ticket prices range from £0.80p to £1.00


22-09-1979 Dandelion Market, Dublin

Attendance, approx 200
Support No Support
Admission, £0.50p

Set; includes, Stories For Boys, Out Of Control, Boy/Girl, Emperors New Clothes
Advert from Hot Press

This was the third & final concert U2 played at the Market in September, they would play these now legendary Market gigs a total of 8 times in 1979.


25-09-1979 Baggot Inn, Dublin

Attendance, unknown
Support, unknown
Admission, unknown

Set; includes Out Of Control, Stories For Boys, Boy/Girl
Date taken from the Dublin Evening Herald "gig guide"

02-10-1979 Baggot Inn, Dublin

Attendance, unknown
Support, unknown
Admission, unknown

Set; includes Out Of Control, Boy/Girl, Stories For Boys.
Date taken from the Dublin Evening Herald "gig guide"
Photo by Tony Daley

U2 go into this gig with high hopes of getting a record deal, two A&R men from EMI are here to see the show. Unfortunately for U2 the A&R men leave before their set is even complete, they go back to their hotel too watch The Specials on The Old Grey Whistle Test.


22-10-1979 Cork Opera House

Attendance, unknown
Main Act, The Bogey Boys, Freddie White Band
Admission, £1.50

Set; includes Stories For Boys, Speed Of Life, Cartoon World, The Kings New Clothes, Inside Out, Another Time Another Place, Boy/Girl, Out Of Control, Encore Glad To See You Go

This gig was recorded for television and would be one of U2's earliest TV appearances. The band opened a bill which included Freddy White and The Bogey Boys-slated to be the next best thing at the time.
The stage of the Cork Opera House is fronted by an orchestra pit which is quite deep and wide. From the moment the band entered, Bono was eying the distance he might have to jump to get to the front row. This was a foretaste of what was to come in far flung halls around the world when the late great Dennis Sheehan would be chasing all over the place trying to protect Bono from himself, and the audience. Bono did not jump at the Cork Opera House, but that impulse was there all the time.
Most of the audience on that October night had never seen or heard of U2 before. But the band did everything in their power on the vast stage of the Opera House to make sure we wouldn't forget them after that short gig. We didn't.
Thomas Parnell

Picture

Picture

This editorial from the "In Dublin" Magazine (left) confirms that U2 did not play on the same bill as Horslip. Eammon Carr of Horslip would not play with U2, because Paul McGuinness took legal action against his brother Jude's fanzine "Heat".

This gig was filmed by RTE (Irish TV), clips of Freddie White & the Bogey Boys can be found on Utube, there is also a bootleg cd of the U2 set.

Picture

Advert taken from the Cork Evening Echo. As you can see from the Opera House gig guide U2 played on the Monday with the Bogey Boys & The Freddie White Band.

26-10-1979 McGonagle's, Dublin

Attendance, unknown
Support, Virgin Prunes, The Blades
Admission, unknown

Advert from "In Dublin"

Set; includes Out Of Control, Boy/Girl, Stories For Boys.

The Blades are; Paul Cleary Bass & Vocals, Lar Cleary Guitar, Pat Larkin Drums


02-11-1979 McGonagle's, Dublin

Attendance, unknown
Support The Blades
Admission, unknown

Advert from Dublin Evening Press

Set; includes Out Of Control, Boy/Girl, Stories For Boys

The Blades are; Paul Cleary Bass & Vocals, Lar Cleary Guitar, Pat Larkin Drums


03-11-1979 Downtown Kampus, Cork

Attendance, unknown
Support for The Tearjerkers
Admission, unknown

Set; includes Boy/Girl, Out Of Control, Stories For Boys, The Emperors New Clothes
Advert from Hot Press

The Tearjerkers are; Paul Maxwell (vocal), Paul "Groover" McIlwaine (guitar), Brian "Brinsley" Rawson (guitar), Howard Ingram (bass), Nigel Hamilton (drums). 

The Tearjerkers were from Northern Ireland. Concerts at the Downtown Kampus are put on by the student union at University College Cork. The original couple of gigs at the Kampus were held in the college canteen, but this venue proved to be too small, so it was moved to the Arcadia Ballroom. The ballroom was a well known showband venue for many years. These concerts were organised by Elvera Butler, founder of Reekus Records in Ireland.

08-11-1979 Junior Common Room TCD, Dublin

Attendance, unknown
Support, unknown
Admission, unknown

From "In Dublin"

Set; includes Emperors New Clothes, Out Of Control, Stories For Boys, Boy/Girl

 

10-11-1979 Belfield, University College, Dublin

Attendance, unknown
Support, unknown
Admission, unknown

From "In Dublin"

Set; includes Out Of Control, Boy/Girl, Stories For Boys


14-11-1979 Claddach Hall, Galway

Attendance, unknown
Support The Atrix
Admission, unknown

Set; includes Out Of Control, Boy/Girl, Stories For Boys

This concert was in aid of the people on Cambodia, there was mass genocide taking place in the country back in '79.
Another charity concert for Cambodia takes place in Galway (within a week), originally U2 were listed on the bill for this weekend long concert at Teach Furbo. Many Dublin bands played this at this event, it's not known why U2 play their own gig. The Atrix are listed as support on the U2 concert poster, The Atrix played the Teach Furbo gig, I don't know if they also played with U2.


15-11-1979 Queen's University, Belfast, Northern Ireland

Attendance, unknown
Support for Squeeze
www.Squeezeoffical.com
Admission, unknown

Set; includes Out Of Control, Boy/Girl, Stories For Boys
Advert from Hot Press

This is the first of two dates that U2 support Squeeze in Northern Ireland. The second date in Coleraine will also have D.C. Nien on the bill.

Squeeze are; Chris Difford (vocal & guitar), Glen Tilbrook (vocal & guitar), Jools Holland (keyboards), Gilson Lavis (drums), John Bentley (bass).


17-11-1979 Dandelion Market, Dublin

Attendance, approx 200
Support The Epidemix
Admission, £0.50

Set; includes Emperors New Clothes, Out Of Control, Stories For Boys, Boy/Girl
Advert from Hot Press

This was the 7th of the now legendary Market gigs, U2 would play this venue 8 times in 19879. This was their farewell concert at the Market, before leaving for London. U2 appear later today on the Irish TV show The Late Late Show.

The Epidemix are: Paul Bonnar (vocal/sax), Colin Devlin (guitar), Gerry Grogan (bass), Dave Bell (drums).


20-11-1979 North University of Ulster, Coleraine, Northern Ireland

Attendance, unknown
Support for Squeeze, DC Nein
www.Squeezeoffical.com
Admission, unknown

 

Set; includes Out Of Control, Boy/Girl, Stories For Boys
Advert from Hot Press

This is U2's second & last concert in Northern Ireland with Squeeze. They will share the bill again with Squeeze at the Leixlip Castle Festival in 1980

Squeeze are; Chris Difford (vocal & guitar), Glen Tilbrook (vocal & guitar), Jools Holland (keyboards), Gilson Lavis (drums), John Bentley (bass).

D.C. Nien are; Damien Gunn (vocals & Sax), Paul McGuinness (guitar), Brendan Gannon (keyboards), Brian Seales (bass), Ken Mahon (drums).


23-11-1979 Trinity College, Dublin

Attendance, unknown
Support, Unknown
Admission, Unknown

 

Set; includes Emperors New Clothes, Out Of Control, Stories For Boys, Boy/Girl

24-11-1979 Downtown Kampus, Cork

Attendance, unknown
Support The parts, Nun Attax
Admission, unknown

Set; includes, Boy/Girl, Stories For Boys, Out of Control.

Advert from Hot Press

This is U2's final Irish show before going to London for the first time for the U2-3 London Club tour in December.

Nun Attax are; Finbarr Donnelly (vocal), Ricky Dineen (guitar), Mick Finnegan (guitar & vocal), Philip O'Connell (bass), Keith "Smelly" O'Connell (drums)

U2 return to Ireland after their short tour of the London clubs and play a few gigs before the end of the year, including their last appearance at the Dandelion Market.

23/12/1979 Dandelion Market, Dublin

Attendance, 400
Support, The Threat
Admission, £1.00

Set; unknown

Advert from Hot Press

26/12/1979 Community Centre, Howth

Attendance, unknown
Support, Fast Skirts, Sounds Unreel
Admission, £1.00

Set; unknown

Advert from Hot Press gig guide

 

29/12/1979 Downtown Kampus, Cork

Attendance, unknown
Main Act, Protex
Admission, unknown

Set; unknown

Advert from Hot Press

This is the last known U2 show of the year.